Data Protection has quickly become a hot talking point this year, forcing businesses and individuals alike to reconsider how safe their sensitive data really is, and the best way to ensure the protection of that information is without a doubt Email Encryption.

 

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Email Encryption is the process of making the information in your mail unreadable to anybody except the recipient - the recipient is the only person who can see past the encryption with the aid of a decryption key. Now, that may be the primary function of email encryption, but as you'll see below there are many ways that this service can benefit you and your business.

 

Protect Information - As mentioned above, this is obviously the primary function of email encryption, and the most common reason for its use. When sending or receiving sensitive information such as invoices, bills, and business deals it's critical to ensure you know exactly who can access it. This concern doesn't apply only to organisations either; personal information such as bank details should always be protected from hackers.

Compliance - Depending on the nature of your business, compliance could be a key reason why encryption is so critical for you. Whether you're working with the financial information of customers, a medical professional with records on patients, or a teacher dealing with student records, encrypted emails can give you the peace-of-mind that their private information is kept safe. A lack of encryption could also lead to GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) data breaches, such as sending an email containing private information to the wrong address. These data breaches can lead to a company being fined up to 4% of annual global turnover or €20 Million - whichever is greater.

Email Recall - Even the most attentive people can sometimes make mistakes, such as sending out the wrong information, or to the wrong person. One of the most helpful features of email encryption is that - if the recipient of your email has not yet opened the mail on their end - you can simply recall the email. For most people this could save a lot of embarrassment but for businesses it is much more serious, with the potential to even save you from some major legal trouble.

Cost Efficiency - Email encryption can potentially save you from many unnecessary costs for your business, such as legal disputes or even fishing out ransom money for hackers who are using your data to blackmail you. However, the main reason encryption can save your company money is because there is no need to purchase additional equipment, software, or private servers. A trusted third-party service costs much less.

Time Efficiency - In the business world, time is money, so removing any extra steps in protecting your data is crucial for efficiency. In the past individuals would have to use multiple programmes, follow many steps, or keep duplicate copies of files to ensure the security of their messages and attachments, but the systems used today are smart, simple, and user-friendly. Not only this, but without encryption you can lose lots of valuable time due to data loss if your information isn't backed up properly.

No Spam Attachments - Spam attachments often contain viruses that allow an 'in' for hackers; this is not only a threat to you, but any customers or contacts on your mailing list. With email encryption you can attach a digital signature to your emails so that the recipient can quickly tell if the email was really sent by you, or if it is spam.

Encryption Doesn't Affect Performance - There's also the 'why not?' argument. In the past encryption and decryption could be quite a burden on the processor and could therefore negatively affect performance. However, with developments over the years this is no longer an issue, so, with all the benefits listed above, there really isn't any good reason to not have email encryption for your business.

Altinet Managed Email Security offers encryption services and more. If you have questions about encryption for you or your business contact us now.

 

Sources:

James Lloyd, SSL expert

IPROmedia

The Guardian